The King visits Gotland

On Wednesday 3 October, The King carried out a visit to Gotland on the theme of cultural heritage.

The King was met at Visby Airport by County Governor Cecilia Schelin Seidegård and County Director Peter Molin.

The day began with a visit to the Swedish National Heritage Board. The board is responsible for issues relating to cultural heritage and cultural environments in Sweden, and is part of the Ministry of Culture.

The King was welcomed to the Swedish National Heritage Board by Director-General Lars Amréus and Deputy Director-General Knut Weibull. The King was then given a presentation of digital services within the field of cultural heritage. Staff from the board also talked about the Cultural Heritage Lab and the development of cultural heritage sciences.

World Heritage Coordinator for the Gotland region Elene Negussie and architectural historian Ulrika Mebus from Gotland Museum led a walk from the East Gate, through the East Graves along Visby City Wall and across Kyrkberget with its views of the city centre.

The King was then welcomed to Visby Cathedral by Chair of the Cathedral Council Inger Harlevi, Dean Mats Hermansson and cathedral organist Claes Holmgren.

The King during the visit to Visby Cathedral. Photo: Karl Melander/Gotland County Council

The King during the visit to Visby Cathedral. Photo: Karl Melander/Gotland County Council

At the cathedral, Dean Mats Hermansson spoke about the restoration of the cathedral and organist Claes Holmgren gave a demonstration of the organ, which dates from 1599.

Photo: Karl Melander/Gotland County Council

Photo: Karl Melander/Gotland County Council

In the afternoon, The King visited Roma Kungsgård, where he was welcomed by

  • Susanne Thedéen, Director of Gotland Museum
  • Per Widerström, archaeologist at Gotland Museum
  • Lars Kruthof, educationalist at Gotland Museum
  • Ingrid Eiken Holmgren, General Director of the National Property Board of Sweden

Here, The King learnt about the cultural environment of Roma Abbey and the recently completed archaeological excavations. Roma Abbey is managed by the National Property Board of Sweden, which has invested in the abbey's surroundings to create an attractive visitor destination.