The King and Queen visit the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention

On Wednesday 20 March, The King and Queen visited the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention to find out how the council contributes towards the development of knowledge with the legal system.

The King and Queen were welcomed by Director General Erik Wennerström, Deputy Director General Björn Borschos and Chief of Staff Anna Westphalen.

The King and Queen were welcomed by Director General Erik Wennerström, Deputy Director General Björn Borschos and Chief of Staff Anna Westphalen. Photo: Sara Friberg/The Royal Court of Sweden

During their visit, The King and Queen received general information about the council's operations and in-depth information about three reports drawn up by the council.

Relationship to the legal system in socially vulnerable areas

In its report on the relationship to the legal system in socially vulnerable areas, the council has used surveys and interviews find out about residents' views on security and confidence in the legal system.

Shootings in criminal environments

The number of fatal shootings in criminal environments has risen in recent years. The council's report on shootings in criminal environments is based on interviews with individuals who have been active in such contexts.

The National Security Investigation

The National Security Investigation is an annual national study relating to the victims of crime and security. The data comes from around 74,000 people who have answered questions via postal and online surveys on exposure to crime, insecurity and fears about crime, confidence in the legal system and their experiences of contact with the legal system.

The King and Queen concluded their visit by meeting employees at the council's centre for combating violent extremism. The centre works to prevent ideologically motivated crime and terrorism.

About the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention

  • The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention is an agency organised under the Ministry of Justice and a centre of knowledge for the legal system.
  • More than 150 employees work at the council, which is based in Stockholm.
  • The role of the council is to contribute towards the development of knowledge within the legal system and the field of criminal policy, and to promote crime prevention work.
  • Find out more about the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention hereexternal link, opens in new window.