Prince Carl Philip attends the Volvo Ocean Race in The Hague

On Friday 29 and Saturday 30 June, Prince Carl Philip attended the Volvo Ocean Race in The Hague, the Netherlands.

Prince Carl Philip is patron of the Volvo Ocean Race, and visited the competition on 29-30 June in The Hague, the Netherlands.

On arrival at the Race Village, Prince Carl Philip met representatives from Volvo and the Volvo Ocean Race during a lunch at Volvo's pavilion.

Prince Carl Philip with Martin Lundstedt, Håkan Samuelsson and Richard Brisius at the Race Village. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

Prince Carl Philip with Martin Lundstedt, Håkan Samuelsson and Richard Brisius at the Race Village. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

Bill Law (Volvo Group and board member of the Volvo Ocean Race), Jan Sidemo (Senior Director Global Events, Volvo Car Group), Richard Brisius (CEO Volvo Ocean Race) and Stephan Hylander (Corporate Brand Events, Volvo Group) also attended the lunch.

During the afternoon, Prince Carl Philip met King Kung Willem Alexander of the Netherlands. In the evening, The Prince attended a dinner in Volvo's pavilion with representatives from Volvo and the Volvo Ocean Race.

Martin Lundstedt (President and CEO, Volvo Group), his wife Eva Lundstedt, Jan Gurander (Volvo Group Deputy CEO and CFO), Henry Sténson (Senior Advisor, Volvo Group), his wife Maria Sténson, Helena Landbergsson (Head of CEO Office) and Jan Sidemo (Senior Director Global Events, Volvo Car Group) also attended the dinner.

Participants at the beach clean-up. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

Participants at the beach clean-up. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

Beach clean-up in The Hague

On Saturday 30 June, The Prince took part in a beach clean-up in The Hague as part of the battle against plastics in our environment. During the clean-up event, The Prince spoke with Lisa Emilia Svensson, Director of Oceans at the United Nations Environment Programme, about how plastic in the sea affects the environment.

The Prince with Lisa Svensson, Director of Oceans at the United Nations Environment Programme. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

The Prince with Lisa Svensson, Director of Oceans at the United Nations Environment Programme. Photo: Mats Lind/Volvo Cars

An in-port race – a shorter sailing race held in the harbour area that can be seen more easily from the land – took place in the afternoon.

Prince Carl Philip on board the Turn the Tide on Plastic competition boat during the Brunel In-Port Race in The Hague. Photo: Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Prince Carl Philip on board the Turn the Tide on Plastic competition boat during the Brunel In-Port Race in The Hague. Photo: Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

At the prize-giving ceremony, Prince Carl Philip presented the first prize to the Dongfeng Race Team.

In the evening, The Prince attended a dinner for the winners of the competition at the World Forum, The Hague. King Willem Alexander of the Netherlands and King Juan Carlos of Spain also attended the dinner.

Prince Carl Philip at the prize-giving ceremony, which King Willem Alexander of the Netherlands and King Juan Carlos of Spain also attended. Photo: Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Prince Carl Philip at the prize-giving ceremony, which King Willem Alexander of the Netherlands and King Juan Carlos of Spain also attended. Photo: Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

The Volvo Ocean Race

The Volvo Ocean Raceexternal link, opens in new window is the world's biggest round-the-round sailing competition, and was first held in 1973-74 under the name the Whitbread Round the World Race. Some of the world's top ocean racing sailors take part in the event.

The round-the-world race is divided up into eleven stages of different lengths. The longest stages last for several weeks, with the shortest lasting just a couple of days. There are no breaks from start to finish – the sailors compete around the clock during each stage, taking it in turn to carry out watches on deck. The teams are awarded points according to their positions in each stage. The team with the most points after the end of the race in The Hague is declared the winner of the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race.

If more than one team has the same number of points, the winner is determined by the positions in the Volvo Ocean Race In-Port Series. In-port races are short spectator sailing races close to land that are held at each port stop. All competing boats are identical, with the sailors' skill determining who wins.