The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates

On Tuesday 11 December, The King hosted the traditional dinner for this year's Nobel Laureates at the Royal Palace of Stockholm.

The evening began with the Royal Family hosting a small reception in Prince Bertil's Apartments for the Nobel Laureates and their spouses.

The Royal Family and the Nobel Laureates then made their way to the State Apartments. In the Royal Palace of Stockholm's ballroom, the Vita Havet Assembly Rooms, the other guests were welcomed. These included representatives from the Swedish Parliament and Government, the diplomatic corps, academies, research, science and the Nobel Foundation.

At around 8 pm, dinner was served in Karl XI's Gallery.

The table was decorated with amaryllises. Photo: Henrik Garlöv/The Royal Court of Sweden

The table was laid with the Brazilian silver service, decorated with amaryllises. Photo: Henrik Garlöv/The Royal Court of Sweden

 

Menu

 

Pernod-infused lobster bisque
with crisp vegetables and dill oil

*

Baked char with roasted golden beets, cream of parsnip
and potatoes, with a lemon butter sauce

*

Herb-baked saddle of venison from the royal hunt with a ragout
of puy lentils, Jerusalem artichoke and game jus with black truffle

*

Baked Alaska with a taste of winter apples

 

The menu for the evening. Photo: Henrik Garlöv/The Royal Court of Sweden

The menu for the evening. Photo: Henrik Garlöv/The Royal Court of Sweden

The table silver for the dinner was from the Brazilian silver service. The service is so called because it previously belonged to the Brazilian imperial family. It was made by Odiot goldsmiths in Paris between 1798 and 1830, and came to Sweden as the inheritance of King Oskar I's consort, Queen Josefina, from her sister the former Empress Amélia of Brazil.

Photo: Henrik Garlöv/The Royal Court of Sweden

The table linen was the Union Linen, woven in 1891 in the French city of Lille.

The glassware by Kosta, designed by Sigurd Persson, was a wedding present to The King and Queen in 1976.

The dinner was served in Karl XI's Gallery at the Royal Palace of Stockholm.

The dinner was served in Karl XI's Gallery at the Royal Palace of Stockholm. Photo: Sara Friberg/The Royal Court of Sweden

The Queen and Chemistry Laureate George P. Smith.

The Queen and Chemistry Laureate George P. Smith. Photo: Sara Friberg/The Royal Court of Sweden

The seating arrangements

The King accompanied Chemistry Laureate Frances H. Arnold to the table. Marcelle Mourou, the wife of Physics Laureate Gérard Mourou, was seated to his left.

The Queen was accompanied to the table by Chemistry Laureate George P. Smith. Medicine Laureate Tasuku Honjo was seated to her right.

The Crown Princess was accompanied to the table by Medicine Laureate Tasuku Honjo. Physics Laureate Gérard Mourou was seated to her right.

Prince Daniel accompanied Marcelle Mourou, wife of Physics Laureate Gérard Mourou, to the table. Professor Marjorie Sable, wife of Chemistry Laureate George P. Smith, was seated to his left.

Prince Carl Philip accompanied Physics Laureate Donna Strickland to the table. Chemistry Laureate Frances H. Arnold was seated to his left.

Princess Sofia was accompanied to the table by Economics Laureate William D. Nordhaus. Chemistry Laureate George P. Smith was seated to her right.

Princess Christina, Mrs Magnuson was accompanied to the table by Medicine Laureate James P. Allison. Economics Laureate William D. Nordhaus was seated to her right.

Economics Laureate Paul M. Romer accompanied Helena Norlén, the wife of Speaker Andreas Norlén, to the table.

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates

On 10 December 1901, the first Nobel Prize was awarded by Crown Prince Gustaf (V)opens in new window. The ceremony was followed by a banquet.

King Oskar IIopens in new window did not show strong support for the prize and the ceremony to begin with, but by 1904 he had already decided to honour the laureates with a gala banquet on the day after the ceremony. Since then the King has hosted an annual dinner for the laureates on 11 December.

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates in 1951. Chef Monsieur Paul Arbin checks whether the saddle of venison is ready. The carving skewer has been stuck into the bone marrow for a while. If the skewer feels warm, the meat is ready. To this day, the main course consists of roe deer from The King's autumn hunt that same year. Photo: Nordiska Museet