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The Royal Wedding

King Carl XVI Gustaf's Jubilee Room

One of the furniture designer Åke Axelsson's guiding principles was that the décor should have a light, bright and airy character, inspired by a Swedish summer. The décor represents Swedish craftsmanship and Swedish materials. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

One of the furniture designer Åke Axelsson's guiding principles was that the décor should have a light, bright and airy character, inspired by a Swedish summer. The décor represents Swedish craftsmanship and Swedish materials. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

The decoration of King Carl XVI Gustaf's Jubilee Room in the Bernadotte Apartments at the Royal Palace of Stockholm was a gift to commemorate The King's 25th jubilee. The King and Queen had long expressed a desire for a room at the Royal Palace of Stockholm that reflected the present day.
The room is used for The King and Queen's official representation in the Bernadotte Apartments.
The rug by textile designer Nini Sandström was woven using knotted pile weaving at Märta Måås-Fjetterström's studio in Båstad, in association with the Association of Friends of Textile Art. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

The rug by textile designer Nini Sandström was woven using knotted pile weaving at Märta Måås-Fjetterström's studio in Båstad, in association with the Association of Friends of Textile Art. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

The Jubilee Room was a gift from the Riksdag and the Swedish Government, which donated the large rug, and from Swedish municipalities, which donated the furniture and the fittings.
 
Furniture designer Åke Axelsson designed all the furniture and had overall responsibility for the décor of the room. The décor was produced in close cooperation with The King.
The walls are papered with sheets of paper painted in watercolour by artist Lars Abrahamsson. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

The walls are papered with sheets of paper painted in watercolour by artist Lars Abrahamsson. Photo: Alexis Daflos/The Royal Court

The history of the room


The room has had a varied history. It was originally decorated in the mid-18th century for the toilette of Queen Lovisa Ulrika, next to her bedchamber. The beautiful painted, gilded moulding and cornicing of the ceiling — probably the work of Johan Pasch — dates from this time, as does the panelling and the beautifully carved doors. The woodwork was originally painted white, with gilded ornamentation.
 
Towards the end of the 19th century, the room was decorated as a bedchamber for Queen Sofia. It was at this time that the paint was removed from the doors, and the panelling and window bays were painted to resemble oak. The old tiled stove in the recess between the windows was replaced with a new, round tiled stove. A cupboard was built between the windows, and has since been replaced with open shelving. Since the death of Queen Sofia, the room has had various uses, including for storage. The textile studio was housed here for many years.