Huvud

Buildings in Haga Park

The Copper Tent. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The Copper Tent. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

Copper Tent


The Copper Tent was built in 1787 to house stables and lodgment for the guards. The southern façade was built to give the illusion of a Sultan's tent on the edge of a forest. Today the Copper Tent houses a restaurant, café and a park museum.
Haga Palace. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

Haga Palace. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

Haga Palace


Earlier known as the “Queen's Pavilion", the Haga Palace was built in 1802-04 by Gustav IV Adolf and designed by the architect Christopher Gjörwell. Throughout the 19th century, the palace was a residence of members of the Royal Family.

Haga Palace was renovated in 1930 and became the residence of Crown Prince Gustav Adolf and Princess Sibylla. The current King of Sweden Carl XVI Gustaf and his sisters were born and raised in Haga Palace.
Since 1966 the palace has been used to accommodate guests of the Swedish government.

The Temple of Echo. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The Temple of Echo. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The Temple of the Echo


The Temple of the Echo was built in 1790 as an outdoor summer dining hall for royalty. Today it is an outdoor museum that is a very popular location for marriages.

Haga Ruins


The foundations of the magnificent palace inspired by Versailles that Gustav III intended to build are all that remain today. In fact, the foundations are all that was ever built as construction of the palace came to standstill following the assassination of Gustav III in 1792.The French architect Jean Louis Desprez was commissioned to design the palace, which was to be positioned in a free line of vision with and as a counterpart to the Royal Palace of Stockholm.  
The bridge to the Royal Cemetery. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The bridge to the Royal Cemetery. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

Royal Cemetery  


The final resting place for several members of the Bernadotte dynasty is located on a point in the Bay of Brunnsviken, including Gustav VI Adolf and Queen Louise. The cemetery is open to the public during the month of May on Sundays and public holidays from 13:00–15:00. It is also open from June-August on Thursdays from 09:00–15:00.

Old Haga


Old Haga was where Gustav III stayed from 1772 until a larger residence was completed. The building has been moved from its original location and today is a private residence.
The Turkish Pavilion. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The Turkish Pavilion. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

The Turkish Pavilion and the Chinese Pagoda


These buildings were part of the magnificent park created by Gustav III. The Turkish Pavilion was the only building erected by C M Piper in the park. It is decorated in Pompeian style by the artist Louis Masreliez.

The Chinese Pagoda is an open octagonal building with a tent roof decorated with a dragon head.

Finnstugan


Finnstugan is the oldest building in Haga Park still situated in its original location. At the turn of the century it was used as a music café. Today the building houses private residences.

The Green House


The Green House, which once served as part of the kitchen gardens to the Royal Court until the latter part of the 19th century, today houses the Butterfly Museum.
A monument at the entrance to Haga Park. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

A monument at the entrance to Haga Park. Photo: Gomer Swahn.

Gates


The gates at the northern entrance of Haga Park once stood in Kungsträdgården in central Stockholm and were moved to Haga by Karl XIV Johan, whose insignia decorated the entrance to the park. The gates at the southern entrance of Haga Park, like those at the northern entrance, also stood at Kungsträdgården and were moved to Haga by Karl XIII, whose insignia decorated the gateway.
 

Haga Mound


The Haga Mound is a restored part of the Stockholmsåsen or Stockholm ridge. Earlier the mound was partly excavated, functioning as a gravel pit, but was restored using excavated material from the Stockholm city centre during the 1960s.
 

19th century buildings


The park also contains a number of privately owned buildings. Houses that were built in the latter part of the 19th century were given names such as China, Japan, Valhalla, Gemstone and Sofieberg.