The King takes part in a Royal Technology Mission visit to Gothenburg and Borås

At the Swedish School of Textiles in Borås, Head of School and Project Leader for Smart Textiles Erik Bresky spoke about weaving methods and about smart textiles, such as fabric that cleans water using only sunlight as a source of energy. Photo: royalcourt.se

On Thursday 10 October and Friday 11 October, The King took part in a Royal Technology Mission visit to Gothenburg and Borås. The visit was arranged by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA).

Thursday 10 October

The visit began at Landvetter on Thursday morning, where President Leif Johansson welcomed The King to IVA's Royal Technology Mission. At Landvetter, The King also met young people from IVA's Technology Leap project. The project is a Government initiative that aims to increase young people's interest in applying to a university of technology after upper secondary school.
 
The mission then continued to Borås and the company Oxeon AB. Oxeon AB was founded in 2003, and has since quickly established itself as a market leader within carbon fibre spread tow fabric, a new type of composite reinforcing fabric based on a patented weaving technique that involves weaving with tapes instead of tows.
 
The second visit in Borås was to the Swedish School of Textiles, where Head of School Erik Bresky welcomed the mission and gave a tour. Erik is also Project Leader for Smart Textilesexternal link, opens in new window.
 
The Swedish School of Textilesexternal link, opens in new window offers education at first- and second-cycle levels, as well as postgraduate education and research. Two research areas that feature within all specialisations are smart textiles and F3: Fashion, Function, Futures.
 
CEO Jörgen Lillieroth then spoke about the company TST Sweden, which develops and markets niche personal protective equipment for extreme environments. Together with Smart Textiles and the Swedish School of Textiles, the company has developed a flexible fabric with extreme properties.
 
After lunch at the Swedish School of Textiles, the mission continued to Gothenburg and the company Arcam AB in Mölndal, where CEO Magnus Renée welcomed the visitors.
 
Arcam manufactures equipment for making components using metal powder directly from digital three-dimensional models, known as additive manufacturing. Products with advanced functionality can thereby be produced in a cost-effective manner.
 
The mission then visited AstraZeneca AB in Mölndal. The King was welcomed by CFO of AstraZeneca Jan-Olof Jacke and Site Manager Peter Nyström.
 
AstraZeneca has 5,800 employees in Sweden, based in Mölndal and Södertälje. The company focuses on researching, manufacturing and marketing prescription pharmaceuticals. One of the company's three global strategic research centres is located in Mölndal. Here, research is carried out primarily within the fields of cardiovascular functions, metabolism (e.g. diabetes), the airways, inflammation and autoimmunity (e.g. rheumatism).

Friday 11 October

The day began with a visit to the Grafen laboratory at Chalmers University of Technologyexternal link, opens in new window. The visitors were welcomed by President of Chalmers University of Technology Karin Markides and Head of Department Dag Winkler.
 
In Chalmers' clean room laboratory, The King saw graphene being produced. Graphene — a single layer of carbon atoms — is stronger than the strongest steel, but is still light and flexible. Its electrical conductivity is better than virtually any other material. In 2010, Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov won the Nobel Prize in Physicsexternal link, opens in new window "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene".
 
The mission then visited the Department of Shipping and Marine Technology, which trains master mariners, naval architects and shore personnel in shipping. The department has Sweden's most extensive simulator centre for marine education and research.

The King at the Department of Shipping and Marine Technology, where Lecturer Reto Weber gave a tour. Reto deals with courses and research in the Full Mission Bridge Simulator and lecturing on ship handling and manoeuvring. Photo: royalcourt.se

The King at the Department of Shipping and Marine Technology, where Lecturer Reto Weber gave a tour. Reto deals with courses and research in the Full Mission Bridge Simulator and lecturing on ship handling and manoeuvring. Photo: royalcourt.se

The morning continued at Öckerö, in the northern archipelago of Gothenburg, at Berg Propulsion AB. There, CEO Marit Börjesson spoke about the company, which was founded back in 1912. The company started as a fishing boat shipyard, and began making propellers in 1929. Today, the company delivers propellers and propulsion systems till industry and merchant shipping. 320 people work at Berg globally, with almost 200 working on the Öckerö islands.
 
After lunch, The King tried out test boats at Volvo Penta.
 
From Öckerö, the mission continued by boat to Lindholm Pier. There, the Royal Technology Mission concluded with a presentation of the Maritime Cluster in western Sweden.
 
In 2012 Region Västra Götaland carried out the Maritime Clusters in Västra Götaland study in association with Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg. Based on a regional perspective, this showed how marine ecosystem services can be used in a way that is sustainable in the long term while also safeguarding ecosystem functions.