The King and Queen visit the Chinese Pavilion

The King and Queen speak with paper conservators Daniel Gillberg from Oslo, Mark Sandiford from the UK and Helen Skinner from Stockholm. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT

Paper conservator Daniel Gillberg. Photo: royalcourt.se

The King and Queen on their way to the Chinese Pavilion to find out about the ongoing work involved in restoring the unique wallpapers from the time of Queen Lovisa Ulrika. Photo: royalcourt.se

On Tuesday 13 May, The King and Queen visited the Chinese Pavilion to find out about the ongoing work involved in restoring the unique mid-18th century wallpapers from the time of Queen Lovisa Ulrika.

The exclusive hand-painted wallpaper was probably purchased via the East India Company. It is decorated with a pattern of birds and flowers, and is made up of five extremely thin layers. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT

The exclusive hand-painted wallpaper was probably purchased via the East India Company. It is decorated with a pattern of birds and flowers, and is made up of five extremely thin layers. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT

During a previous restoration the wallpaper was affixed to fabric, but this has damaged the delicate paper. Work is now being carried out to remove the wallpaper from the fabric, restoring the damaged sections, and finally re-mounting the wallpaper.

The restoration is being carried out by three paper conservators, one of whom is Helen Skinner:

"We combine modern techniques with ancient Japanese and Chinese traditions, and approach this unique treasure – which is part of the World Heritage Site Drottningholm – with great respect and care."

The restored wallpaper can be seen by visiting the Chinese Pavilion, which is open daily from 11:00 to 16:30.

About the Chinese Pavilion

On Queen Lovisa Ulrika's birthday in 1753, King Adolf Fredrik surprised her with a small Chinese-style pavilion in Drottningholm Park. It was a much-appreciated gift, coming at a time when the whole of Europe was developing a passion for all things Chinese.

The original wooden construction was replaced by a more durable building in the 1760s, which is now home to one of the foremost examples of Chinese-themed Rococo interiors.

The Chinese Pavilion is open to visitors between May and September. A guided tour, included in the admission price, makes the visit even more memorable.

Find out more about the Chinese Pavilion hereopens in new window.