The Crown Princess visits the Nationalmuseum

The Crown Princess with Museum Director Berndt Arell. Photo: royalcourt.se

One result of the renovation work is that the public areas are being expanded. Photo: royalcourt.se

For the first time in 148 years, the Nationalmuseum building on Blasieholmen is undergoing comprehensive renovation work. Photo: royalcourt.se

As before, the upper exhibition floor will be accessed via the grand staircase. Photo: royalcourt.se

The building is one of only a few preserved 19th century museum buildings in Europe. Photo: royalcourt.se

On Friday 25 April, The Crown Princess visited the Nationalmuseum where she was given a guided tour by Museum Director Berndt Arell through the empty building, which is currently undergoing extensive renovation work.

The Nationalmuseum in Stockholm closed on 3 February 2013 for renovation. The National Property Board has been commissioned by the Swedish Government to renovate and rebuild the museum, in order to create a completely modern museum building that is adapted for the museum operations of the future, while still retaining the historic value of this unique listed museum building.

One of the most striking changes is that many of the building's more than 300 windows, which were previously sealed to protect the art works from harmful daylight, are being opened up.

The Nationalmuseum


The Nationalmuseumexternal link, opens in new window is Sweden's largest art museum. The collections consist of paintings, sculptures and drawings from around the 16th century to the 20th century, as well as crafts and design objects from the 16th century to the present day. The building was designed by the German architect Friedrich August Stüler, and was completed in 1866. The museum's history dates back to 28 June 1792, when the Royal Museum was founded. The Royal Museum opened in 1794 in the North Logården Wing of the Royal Palace of Stockholm. The Nationalmuseum is thereby one of Europe's oldest art museums.