The Crown Princess opens the exhibition "Frogs: jewels of the jungle"

The Crown Princess, Jonas Wahlström and the cane toad. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

The Crown Princess with the cane toad, which was given the Latin name Rana Marina by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

The Crown Princess, Princess Estelle and Jonas Wahlström's grandson Emil Wahlström look at the frogs. Photo: David Sica/Stella Pictures

On Wednesday 16 April, The Crown Princess opened the exhibition "Frogs: jewels of the jungle" at Skansen Aquarium in Stockholm.

Jonas Wahlström, Director of Skansen Aquarium, began the opening ceremony by speaking about frogs. He mentioned that the number of frogs found in the wild is a simple way of measuring the health of the natural world. Unfortunately, almost half the world's 6,400 or so species of frogs are seriously endangered. For more than 500 species, zoos are the only chance of survival in the hope that their habitats can be restored.

The world's frogs maintain the balance of the ecosystem, since they eat large quantities of insect pests. They are also extremely important in other ways. For example, a number of substances used in many medicines originate from frogs.

The Crown Princess opened the exhibition "Frogs: jewels of the jungle" by releasing a 1 kg cane toad into a jungle environment.

The Crown Princess and Princess Estelle meet the cane toad. Photo: Bo Jonsson/Skansen Aquarium

The Crown Princess and Princess Estelle meet the cane toad. Photo: Bo Jonsson/Skansen Aquarium

"Frogs: jewels of the jungle" describes the threats to frogs and toads, and shows many of the uniquely beautiful and tiny arrow-poison frogs, various tree frogs, tomato frogs and one of the world's largest toad species.

About Skansen Aquarium

Skansen Aquarium was opened by The King in 1978. Skansen Aquarium is run by Jonas Wahlström, and is also a breeding centre for endangered small apes and prosimians.