Images from Haga Palace

The main entrance. The décor of the main entrance links together the grounds around the palace and the interiors of the main apartment. The design of the modern chairs is inspired by the sulla chairs found in the Grand Room and in the adjacent Gustav III's Pavilion, while the photographs by Ralf Turander feature themes from Drottningholm and Ockelbo. In this way, the interior is also connected to the history of the palace and its present-day use. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

Since autumn 2010, The Crown Princess Couple have lived at Haga Palace, where a number of rooms in the main apartment are used for The Crown Princess Couple's official representation.
The Grand Room. The fireplace in the Grand Room features the coats of arms of the Bernadotte and Sahsen-Cobug-Gotha dynasties, since it was installed as part of the renovation work in the 1930s when Prince Gustaf Adolf and Princess Sibylla moved in. The sulla chair, which dates from the late 18th century, has been carefully restored by the Royal Collections, enabling it to be brought back into use at the palace. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The Grand Room. The fireplace in the Grand Room features the coats of arms of the Bernadotte and Sahsen-Cobug-Gotha dynasties, since it was installed as part of the renovation work in the 1930s when Prince Gustaf Adolf and Princess Sibylla moved in. The sulla chair, which dates from the late 18th century, has been carefully restored by the Royal Collections, enabling it to be brought back into use at the palace. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

About Haga Palace


By Lars Ljungström, Senior Curator of the Royal Collections
 
In the same year that King Gustav IV Adolf and Queen Fredrika had their third child, they decided to build a palace at Haga as a complement to Gustav III's Pavilion, which was no longer big enough for the family. Haga Palace was primarily intended for the children, which according to the practice of the time required an apartment each, despite their young ages.
Haga Palace was designed by Carl Christoffer Gjörwell (1766-1837), and the building was virtually complete by autumn 1805. At around the same time, Sweden was drawn into the Napoleonic War, and furnishing the new palace was therefore less urgent. It was not until May 1808 that a furnishing plan was produced, and it appears that this was far from completion by the time of the coup d'état of 1809, when King Gustav IV Adolf and his family were sent into exile. They had started to use the palace, but only provisionally.
 
The main apartment consists of a suite of five rooms along the façade, facing Brunnsviken. The majority of these rooms are used by The Crown Princess Couple for official representation. There is a main room in the centre, a living room to the north, and a library and a dining room to the south.
The living room. The living room has a modern, welcoming style, and is dominated by Ralf Turander's photography, featuring themes taken from books from the Bernadotte Library at the Royal Palace of Stockholm. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The living room. The living room has a modern, welcoming style, and is dominated by Ralf Turander's photography, featuring themes taken from books from the Bernadotte Library at the Royal Palace of Stockholm. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The apartment was originally used as two suites. From the staircase, the apartment was entered via a large communal dining room (now the Grand Room), with identical suites of drawing rooms and bedrooms on either side. The north suite was used by Crown Prince Gustav (later Prince of Vasa), while his sister Princess Sofia Vilhelmina had the south suite. Her drawing room is the present-day library, and her bedroom is now the dining room.
The library. The library also features a fireplace dating from the 1930s. The painting to the right of the fireplace shows a view of Haga Palace during the time of King Gustav IV Adolf. It was painted by Louis Belanger, and now belongs to the art collection of the City of Stockholm. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The library. The library also features a fireplace dating from the 1930s. The painting to the right of the fireplace shows a view of Haga Palace during the time of King Gustav IV Adolf. It was painted by Louis Belanger, and now belongs to the art collection of the City of Stockholm. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

Later on, King Oskar I and Queen Josefina used the palace as a summer residence and lived in the same apartment, eventually followed by their younger son, Prince August and his wife Teresia. More famously, the parents of H.M. The King also lived at Haga Palace. Then, the large room was used as a living room, the current library was Prince Gustaf Adolf's study, and the dining room was used for the same purpose as today. The Crown Princess Couple's living room was sometimes known as Princess Sibylla's study and parlour.
The dining room. The dining room is dominated by a table which can be extended if necessary to the entire length of the room. In the background, between the two windows facing out on Brunnsviken, is one of the palace's wall mirrors dating from the time when the palace was built. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The dining room. The dining room is dominated by a table which can be extended if necessary to the entire length of the room. In the background, between the two windows facing out on Brunnsviken, is one of the palace's wall mirrors dating from the time when the palace was built. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The dining room. Detail. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

The dining room. Detail. Photo: Klas Sjöberg/The Royal Court

Haga Palace was redecorated in the 1860s (for Prince August and Princess Teresia) and then again for Prince Gustaf Adolf and Princess Sibylla in the 1930s. As a result, instead of historic interiors, the rooms contain details from a number of different periods and many features have been added over the past century.
 
All the images can be downloaded from the Media Centreopens in new window.
 
Find out more about Haga Palace hereopens in new window.
 
Find out more about Haga Park hereopens in new window.