The King presents the 2010 Nobel Prizes

Crown Princess Victoria. Photo: Leif R Jansson/Scanpix

On Friday 10 December, The Royal Family participated in the traditional Nobel festivities, beginning with the award ceremony at Stockholm Concert Hall.
The festivities began at Stockholm Concert Hall, where the King awarded the Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Medicine and Literature, as well as the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel.
 
This year's Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Professor Andre Geim and Dr Konstantin Novoselov. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Professor Richard F. Heck, Professor Ei-ichi Negishi and Professor Emeritus Akira Suzuki. The Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Professor Robert G. Edwards, and the Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Mario Vargas Llosa.
 
The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel was awarded to Professor Peter A. Diamond, Professor Dale T. Mortensen and Professor Christopher A. Pissarides.
 
The festivities concluded with the Nobel Banquet at Stockholm City Hall.

Jewellery and attire


The King wore the Order of the Seraphim's light blue ribbon, decoration and grand star, the Order of Vasa's grand cross and star and the Order of the Polar Star's cross in a black sash around his neck. He also wore four memorial medals of Kings Gustaf V, Gustaf VI Adolf, Haakon VII and Olav V of Norway (miniature badges).
 
The Queen wore an emerald green dress in silk satin with a ruffled hem and a bolero jacket. She wore the Leuchtenberg Sapphires in her tiara, earrings and necklace. She also wore the Order of the Seraphim's light blue ribbon, decoration and grand star, as well as a miniature portrait of The King framed with brilliants.
 
The Crown Princess wore a beige chiffon and silk crêpe dress with sequin and pearl embroidery. With this she wore the Steel Tiara, pearl earrings and a brilliant necklace. She also wore the Order of the Seraphim's light blue ribbon, decoration and grand star, as well as a miniature portrait of The King framed with brilliants.
 
Prince Carl Philip and Prince Daniel wore the Order of the Seraphim's light blue ribbon, decoration and grand star. Prince Carl Philip also wore three medals in miniature — The King's Commemorative Medal, the National Service Medal and the Karlberg Medal.
 
Find out more about the Nobel Prizeexternal link, opens in new window.

More information about the jewellery


The Leuchtenberg Sapphires consist of an ensemble of a tiara, earrings, necklace, brooch and hairpins in diamonds and deep blue sapphires. The set came to Sweden when they were left to Queen Josefina by her mother Augusta Amalia, Duchess of Leuchtenberg, in 1846. It was probably made by Marie-Etienne Nitot (1750-1809), who worked in Paris. The tiara is characteristic of both its time and its creator. It is made up of eleven sections, making it easy to adapt according to the wearer's wishes. This is a compact tiara, with stylised palmetto leaves and laurel wreaths surrounding diamond-edged sapphires.
 
If required, the sapphires can be removed from the tiara and replaced with large pearls. The necklace consists of fourteen rosettes with brilliants and sapphires, separated by brilliants. Nine suspended drops with sapphires and brilliants are attached to this. The two earrings belonging to the set are not original. Queen Victoria did not wear earrings on principle, and it is thought that she either gave them away or had them remade into some other piece of jewellery. When Crown Princess Louise inherited the jewellery, the earrings were missing and she had two of the four hairpins from the set made into earrings.
 
The Steel Tiara was made for Queen Hortense of Holland (1783-1837). The lower band has magnificent inset flowers. Five high ears of wheat rise above this, surrounded by oak leaves and acorns. The tiara features a contrast between the whiteness of the stones and the gold-coloured metal. However, the tiara contains neither diamonds nor gold. It consists of steel and gilt brass, two materials that were highly fashionable in the early 19th century.