The King visits the Salvation Army's women's centre in Akalla

On Tuesday 28 March, The King visited the Salvation Army's women's centre in Akalla to find out about its operations and to meet Compass Rose Scholarship recipient Madeleine Sundell. She now works as the Salvation Army's national coordinator against human trafficking.

On Tuesday 28 March, The King visited the Salvation Army's women's centre in Akalla to find out about its operations and to meet Compass Rose Scholarship recipient Madeleine Sundell. She now works as the Salvation Army's national coordinator against human trafficking.

Madeleine Sundell, who received the Young Leadership Foundation'sexternal link, opens in new window Compass Rose Scholarship in 2009, began by describing what the scholarship has meant for her. The Compass Rose Scholarship is presented each year to young leaders who have demonstrated particular courage, consideration and energy.

Compass Rose Scholarship recipient Madeleine Sundell and The King. Photo: royalcourt.se

Madeleine Sundell was a volunteer Scout leader and a legal student when she was awarded the Compass Rose Scholarship for having "strengthened Scouting values both locally and internationally through encounters between different living situations, and – despite difficulties – having worked energetically to achieve value-based aid work" as part of a Scout exchange project between Sweden and Zimbabwe. Since then, she has gained experience of the UN's work with human rights, completed leadership training at the Stockholm School of Economics and carried out field work in southern Africa. During her travels around the world, she came into contact with the work of the Salvation Army – an organisation with a presence in 127 countries – on several occasions. Since 2014, she has been the Salvation Army's national coordinator against human trafficking.

During the classroom visit. Photo: royalcourt.se

Jenny Alm then spoke about the work of the women's centre. Foreign-born women come here from all around the Stockholm region to learn how to speak and read Swedish, and to find out about Swedish society. This is also a place to make friends. If the centre had not existed, many of the women would stay at home, isolated from Swedish society.

Madeleine Sundell, The King, Rahel and Jenny Alm during the visit to the women's centre. Photo: royalcourt.se

The King also met Rahel who talked about her life, having fled Ethiopia as a twelve-year-old and coming as a lone refugee child to Sweden, followed by a long wait for a residence permit.

Teacher Maria Sandberg welcomes The King to a Swedish lesson. Photo: royalcourt.se

The King then visited a classroom where he saw a Swedish lesson, with the topic for the day being the Royal Family and forms of government in different countries.

The visit to the centre concluded with a cake buffet, featuring recipes from around the world. The women who visit the centre had baked specialities from their home countries.

The visit concluded with coffee and cakes. Photo: royalcourt.se

The cake buffet. Photo: royalcourt.se