State visit from Iceland – day 3

The state visit from Iceland continued on Friday 19 January. The third and final day of the state visit was held in Uppsala. The agenda included visits to the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), the Ångström Laboratory and Uppsala University.

The final day of the state visit began at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)external link, opens in new window in Ultuna. The King and Queen and the Presidential couple were given an introduction to the work involved in how consumers can make good, sustainable choices when it comes to food, taking economic, ecological, social and health-related aspects into consideration.

There were also discussions on animal welfare, focusing on Icelandic horses within the tourism sector. SLU is carrying out a project together with Hólar University College on Iceland to estimate how much weight individual horses can carry.

Annsofie Wahlström, Programme Director for SLU Future Foods, talks about sustainable food production. SLU Future Food has been commissioned to identify key issues for the food supply of the future, and to contribute towards creating sustainable food systems. Photo: royalcourt.se

The next item on the agenda was a visit to the Ångström Laboratoryexternal link, opens in new window, where several of Uppsala University's science departments are based. The Department of Engineering Sciences is one of them. Here, pioneering research is carried out within sustainable technology, energy supplies and life sciences. During their visit, the Presidential couple and The King and Queen were given an introduction to the research fields of renewable energy and electric energy conversion, as well as natural hazards and disaster science.

In the Chancellor's Room in the University Main Building, the Presidential couple and The King and Queen are welcomed to Uppsala University by Västgöta Nation's male voice choir, Korgossarna. Photo: royalcourt.se

There then followed a visit to Uppsala University. The traditional welcoming ceremony was followed by two talks: 'It is written in the sky – The Uppsala Edda as a mythological description of the sky above us' by Professor Gisli Sigurdsson from the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, and 'Uppsala and the Viking-Age heritage of Iceland' by Neil Price, Professor of Archaeology at Uppsala University.

The University Main Building is the main building at Uppsala University. The foundation stone was laid by King Oscar II in spring 1879, and the building was opened on 17 May 1887. The architect was Herman Teodor Holmgren. Photo: royalcourt.se

The 800-year-old Uppsala Edda, which was written by Snorri Sturlasson, was then shown in the Carolina Rediviva Library. It has been part of the library's collections since 1669, when it was donated to university by Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie.

Eliza Reid, President Jóhannesson, The Queen and The King during their visit to the Carolina Rediviva Library, where the 800-year-old Uppsala Edda was shown to the visitors. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

Snorri Sturlasson's Edda has also been called the Younger or Prose Edda. The work was written by Snorri on Iceland in the early 1200s. It was intended to act as a guide to poetic art. Photo: royalcourt.se

At Uppsala Castle, President Jóhannesson then presented a gift to the nation of Sweden: 500 copies of the new Swedish translation of the Icelandic sagas in five volumes.

After an introduction by Professor Emeritus Lars Lönnroth, who carried out much of the translation work, Iceland's Minister for Foreign Affairs Gudlaugur Þór Þórðarson presented the gift to Sweden's Minister for Culture and Democracy Alice Bah Kuhnke.

County Governor Göran Enander then hosted lunch.

The state visit from Iceland concluded after lunch with a departure ceremony at Uppsala Castle.

Iceland's Minister for Foreign Affairs Gudlaugur Þór Þórðarson presents a gift, a new translation of the Icelandic sagas, to Sweden's Minister for Culture and Democracy Alice Bah Kuhnke. Photo: The Royal Court

State visit from Iceland

From Wednesday 17 to Friday 19 January, Iceland's President Guðni Thorlacius Jóhannesson visited Sweden at the invitation of The King. The state visit focused on Iceland and Sweden's shared history, values and culture, as well as sustainability, home building and medical research cooperation.

President Jóhannesson came to Sweden with his wife, Eliza Jean Reid. The accompanying delegation included Minister for Foreign Affairs Guðlaugur Þór Þórðarson and representatives from Icelandic businesses and organisations.

The three-day visit took in the cities of Stockholm and Uppsala.

Find out about the first day of the state visit hereopens in new window.

Find out about the second day of the state visit hereopens in new window.