The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates

On Sunday 11 December, The King hosted the traditional dinner for this year's Nobel Laureates at the Royal Palace of Stockholm.

The guests were received and greeted by the Royal Family in the Vita Havet Assembly Rooms. The dinner was served in Karl XI's Gallery.

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Mushroom timbale with pickled chanterelles,
winter salad and black truffle foam
*
Fried turbot fillet with baked oysters,
variation on broccoli and cauliflower and oyster butter sauce
*
Saddle of venison from the royal hunt
with roasted Jerusalem artichoke, vinegar glazed salsify,
spinach tossed in rapeseed oil and creamy green pepper sauce
*
Meringue with vanilla ice cream, caramel in a chocolate ice cream,
meringues and sauce of melted white chocolate flavoured with Baileys

The table is set for the evening's dinner in Karl XI's Gallery. The floral decorations consist of poinsettias and eucalyptus. The table silver – in other words, the decorative silverware – comes from the Brazilian silver service. The table was laid with the Linen Chamber's oldest linen, the Union Linen. This was woven in 1891, in Lille in France. Photo: royalcourt.se

The seating arrangements

The King accompanied Mariko Ohsumi, wife of Medicine Laureate Yoshinori Ohsumi, to the table. Elizabeth Bootsma, wife of Chemistry Laureate Bernard L. Feringa, was seated to his left.

The Queen was accompanied to the table by Physics Laureate Michael Kosterlitz. Chemistry Laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage was seated to her right.

The Crown Princess was accompanied to the table by Chemistry Laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage. Physics Laureate F. Duncan M. Haldane was seated to her right.

Prince Daniel accompanied Elizabeth Bootsma, wife of Chemistry Laureate Bernard L. Feringa, to the table. Anneli Holmström, wife of Economics Laureate Bengt Holmström, was seated to his left.

Prince Carl Philip accompanied Catharina Lindqvist, wife of Marshal of the Realm Svante Lindqvist, to the table. Mariko Ohsumi, wife of Medicine Laureate Yoshinori Ohsumi, was seated to his left.

Princess Sofia was accompanied to the table by Physics Laureate F. Duncan M. Haldane. Chemistry Laureate Sir J. Fraser Stoddart was seated to her right.

Princess Madeleine was accompanied to the table by Medicine Laureate Yoshinori Ohsumi. Physics Laureate Michael Kosterlitz was seated to her right.

Christopher O'Neill accompanied Anneli Holmström, wife of Economics Laureate Bengt Holmström, to the table. Simone Carmen Boni, wife of Chemistry Laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage, was seated to his left.

Physics Laureate David J. Thouless accompanied Anna Nilsson, wife of First Marshal of the Court Mats Nilsson, to the table.

Chemistry Laureate Bernard L. Feringa accompanied Odile Belmont, partner of Physics Laureate F. Duncan M. Haldane, to the table.

Economics Laureate Oliver Hart accompanied Alison Stoddart, daughter of Chemistry Laureate Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, to the table.

Economics Laureate Bengt Holmström accompanied Jenni Ahlin, wife of Speaker Urban Ahlin, to the table.

The glass service was a wedding present from the Swedish Government and the Riksdag to The King and Queen in 1976. It was made by Kosta and designed by Sigurd Persson. Photo: royalcourt.se

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates

On 10 December 1901, the first Nobel Prize was awarded by Crown Prince Gustaf (V). The ceremony was followed by a banquet.

King Oskar II did not show strong support for the prize and the ceremony to begin with, but by 1904 he had already decided to honour the laureates with a gala banquet on the day after the ceremony. Since then the King has hosted an annual dinner for the laureates on 11 December.