About The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates

Motiv: The King's Nobel dinner in 1953. Photo from the Bernadotte Library's archive.
On Wednesday 11 December, The King traditionally hosts a dinner for the year's Nobel Laureates at the Royal Palace of Stockholm. This tradition began in 1904.

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates


On 10 December 1901, the first Nobel Prize was awarded by Crown Prince Gustaf (V). The ceremony was followed by a banquet.
 
King Oskar II did not show strong support for the prize and the ceremony to begin with, but by 1904 he had already decided to honour the laureates with a gala banquet on the day after the ceremony. Since then the King has hosted an annual dinner for the laureates on 11 December.
 
At the first dinners, held in the early 1900s, seven courses were normally served. Just four courses are now served. Today, the main course always consists of roe deer from The King's autumn hunt that same year.
King Gustaf VI Adolf and Queen Louise welcome Lady Churchill to the Nobel dinner in 1953. Sir Winston Churchill won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, but was unable to attend the Nobel festivities as he was at a conference in Bermuda with President Eisenhower. Lady Churchill attended the prize-giving ceremony and the King's dinner in his place. Photo from the Bernadotte Library's archive.

King Gustaf VI Adolf and Queen Louise welcome Lady Churchill to the Nobel dinner in 1953. Sir Winston Churchill won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, but was unable to attend the Nobel festivities as he was at a conference in Bermuda with President Eisenhower. Lady Churchill attended the prize-giving ceremony and the King's dinner in his place. Photo from the Bernadotte Library's archive.

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates in 1953. Then, as now, the table silver – in other words, the decorative silverware – came from the Brazilian silver service, which belonged to Princess Amalie of Leuchtenberg and her husband, Don Pedro I of Brazil (hence the name). Photo from the Bernadotte Library's archive.

The King's dinner for the Nobel Laureates in 1953. Then, as now, the table silver – in other words, the decorative silverware – came from the Brazilian silver service, which belonged to Princess Amalie of Leuchtenberg and her husband, Don Pedro I of Brazil (hence the name). Photo from the Bernadotte Library's archive.

Everything is ready for The King's 2013 dinner for the Nobel Laureates. Photo: royalcourt.se

Everything is ready for The King's 2013 dinner for the Nobel Laureates. Photo: royalcourt.se